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Zahnwhea George

 

Hometown: Atlanta, Georgia

Major: Psychology

Class of 2012

 

Why I Chose Armstrong: “Armstrong is a small university, where the professors get to know you on a personal level. My professors all know me by name and they know my story.”

Favorite Pirate Experience: Interning at the Public Defender’s Office, working with a forensic social worker

 

2nd Time’s The Charm

For Zahnwhea George, a senior major in Psychology at Armstrong, the second time’s the charm.

This Atlanta native, whose parents hail from Liberia, originally attended Armstrong as a Political Science major, but dropped out after two years. She went to Mozambique for nine months, where she worked at a children’s orphanage. That experience turned out to be a turning point in her life.

“I was really able to see the world beyond the United States,” she says. “That experience really taught me the value of hard work and education. It taught me about not taking opportunities for granted.”

She decided to return to Armstrong to finish her degree and to major in Psychology. After seeing how resilient the children at the orphanage in Mozambique were, despite the fact that many of them had experienced trauma and abuse, she became fascinated by human psychology.

“I’ve been able to make good grades and have been on the Dean’s List several times,” she reports of her return to Armstrong. “My professors judge me by the work I’m doing now, not by my past mistakes, which I really appreciate.”

After graduating in December, Zahnwhea hopes to work with women and children who have experienced trauma and to become a clinical psychologist. She recently began an internship at the Public Defender’s Office in Savannah, where she has had the opportunity to help individuals in need of social programs, job training and GED classes

On campus, she particularly enjoys taking upper level psychology classes like Child Psychology and Women and Mental Health. “It really gives you the chance to discuss what you think about different approaches to psychology and what your contribution should be to the future of the field,” she says. “I enjoy getting to hear the perspectives of my classmates.”

Zahnwhea is grateful to have a second chance to pursue her education at Armstrong and plans to make the most of her future.

“I came to college when I was 17, but I didn’t really see college as an investment in my future at the time,” she explains. “I’ve really changed my attitude and appreciate all the opportunities I’ve had at Armstrong. I’m excited about what the future holds.”

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